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Wednesday, December 03, 2008

veganomics



W
ell its not wolf blood thats for sure! Its pomegranate.
The Pomegranate (Punica granatum) is a fruit-bearing deciduous shrub or small tree growing to 5–8 m tall. The pomegranate is native to the region from Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Iran to the Himalayas in northern India and has been cultivated and naturalized over the whole Mediterranean region and the Caucasus since ancient times. It is widely cultivated throughout Armenia, Iran, India, the drier parts of southeast Asia, Malaya, the East Indies, and tropical Africa. Introduced into Latin America and California by Spanish settlers in 1769, pomegranate is now cultivated mainly in the drier parts of California and Arizona for its fruits exploited commercially as juice products gaining in popularity since 2001. In the global functional food industry, pomegranate is often mentioned among a novel category of exotic plant sources called "superfruits"

I thought of calling this 'veggie sunrise' and 'tropical borscht' and maybe a couple other equally unnoteworthy titles then I settled simply on 'veganomics' I dont know why.



Tropical borscht is probably the better description of this refreshing soup that is a mix of hot and cold that can be served warm as well. It is simple to make (I say that everytime huh?) but this time it is super simple, so simple its hard to call it cooking.



A little pomegranate juice some steamed winter vegetables, in this case its turnip, butternut squash and yam, and some pomegranate seeds. Thats it. Eat it hot or cold or a mix like say warm juice and warm veggies or cold juice and warm veggies. No matter the temperature the flavor is thrilling!

22 comments:

Marjie said...

Pomegranites are good stuff! A little sweet and tart at the same time.

pinknest said...

wow, tropical borscht! hahaha. sounds delicious and looks fun to me. although i'm intrigued by this wolf blood.

Chef E said...

Fantastic, and educational as well :)

Kitt said...

Tasty! It must be tropical fruit day ;-)

doggybloggy said...

marjie: and good as a soup base too...

pinknest: oh its part of a childrens story...it is a fun soup though...

chef e: touche....funny bone!

kitt: it must be...

buffalodick said...

Interesting stuff! Nice starter to a meal!

snugs said...

wolf blood...you crack me up! I am glad you are back to your funny self again, but I am not sold on the soup though

Joie de vivre said...

You've snapped out of your food funk with a very imaginative dish. Every Christmas eve my mother in law makes a Swedish dish, fruit soup. This looks just as tasty.

VE said...

See...now this isn't dressed up as some meat replacement like so many things I see. Really, I don't think Vegans care if their food looks like meat. In fact I think they rather wouldn't like it to.

And now, I call upon you to help out VE in his time of need. Proceed to my Tue Dec 2nd blog post. The gnomes are waiting...

Spin said...

Mmmm, I love pomegranites. Tis the season!

micky-t screwing off again said...

Phfrankie let his rot on the tree this year. Go tell him that's no way to be veganomic.

The Blonde Duck said...

Neat!

doggybloggy said...

buffalo: it would be a nice starter or a little palate cleanser during

snugs: I didnt say sheep at least...

joie de vivre: I snapped out - it took more energy to be in a funk than out of one..

ve: you must be running for something..huh?

spin: they look like they came off the poinsetta tree....

micky t: let me go over there and have a look...

TBD: funny funny girl...

Anette said...

I just imagined myself lying on my belly, on top of one of those chunks of turnip (being very tiny of course) with a long straw, slurping the red sea of red fresh tasting soup!

TavoLini said...

Pomegranates really did seem to explode onto the scene a few years ago. I'd never heard of them until college; the same gal who introduced me to pomegranates also introduced me to cooking in banana leaves, Toots and the Maytals, and capoeira. Sometimes I wish I could just go to college for the rest of my life ;)

TavoLini said...

whoa! Anette's comment is super cool!

doggybloggy said...

anette: that sounds so cool - floating in a pomegranate sea...

tavolini: funny to use the word 'exploding' because pomegranates are a fertility symbol and a pomegranate is smashed into a newlyweds room to symbolize all the 'seeds' of their union...

Emily said...

It is pomegranate season, isn't it?! Thanks for the reminder.

Bina said...

I think I've had pomegranites before, but not sure.

Tell me, what about persimines? Is that how you spell it? You either see them smashed all over the road from dropping from the trees, or people pulled over on the side of the road picking them. But I have no idea what to do with them!

Tanya Kristine said...

i dno't know how to eat a pomegranite. can you show me?

doggybloggy said...

emily: that is surely is and you are welcome

bina: I e mailed you some suggestions....

tanya K: can I show you like a 'tennis pro'

marjie: you know you might be right!

ttfn300 said...

this looks awesome! so simple and delicious :) thanks for visiting my blog!

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